[Interview] The Mission Behind Tanagokoro: A Culinary Portrait

BushwickFilmFest I Home Plays with the Feature Film, Come Back Anytime

Location:
 Online
Date: Sunday, October 24, 2021
Time: 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Price: $15 – Buy Now

Long time readers of this blog will know that I love sushi. After watching Tanagokoro: A Culinary Portrait, I don’t think I can look at many local Japanese restaurants the same ever again. The practice of Ikejime is not everywhere and this short documentary really extols the virtue of what it means to be an ethical chef. That is, to harvest the food in a way that won’t stress the product so that you’ll get the best flavour hitting those taste buds. In this work’s case, it’s all about how to best catch that fish, keep it alive and slaughter it before hitting the dinner table.

Victoria Fistes and Masashi Nozaki are both the directors and producers of this work. They produced an excellent look at the man who’s trying to revolutionize an industry, one country at a time. Victoria is a filmmaker who has worked on commercials, short films and documentaries. She’s best known for “Being Ernest,” which shares the experiences of a young blind boy. More recently, she has worked as an Assistant Producer on the documentary “Misha and The Wolves“ and as a Production Assistant on “The Reason I Jump” which won the Sundance Audience Award in 2020.

Masashi has an immense passion for culturally connecting Japan and the world. He is a producer/director who provides consultation to national companies and collaborates locally on projects with creators.

I had a chance to correspond with the team about this work:

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A Victorian Theatrical Halloween Guide 2019

Looking for some last minute things to do in the days leading up to Halloween? Ed published his guide on our sister site: otakunoculture.com and it’s republished here for your convenience.

Otaku no Culture

nullBy Ed Sum
(The Vintage Tempest)

Halloween has become synonymous with humanity’s once in the year obsession with all things occult. Whether that’s with ghosts, the macabre or fantastic beasts, folks celebrate it in myriad ways as part of this season’s tradition.

Not on this list are the traditional staples–ghostly walks, haunted fun houses and public ghost hunts–and I’m going for unique one offs. Included are theatre productions that are not rinse and repeat. Yes, while we all love to get our Rocky Picture Show on, and Atomic Vaudeville deserves special mention for putting on two different productions.

The call is out there for theatre groups or organizations with an event they wish to have listed that is not on here. Please check the contact us section to email or reply with your event!

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[Victoria Fringe Festival ’14] Finding Mask Over Matter, A Review

Presented by Lightning Theatre

Mask over Matter is one of those plays with a name that conjures forth visages of wonderment and intrigue. Instead, the show offers a mix of pantomime and improv where the performers are wearing a mask in order to play archetypical characters from many a narrative. In what they represent are not necessarily that of comedy and tragedy that Greek theatre made famous. The style hails from Italy where it’s more commonly known as Commedia dell’arte. Deception is used to create its humour, and it’s a different type of improv that many may not be familiar with, much less get.

At least for this young comedy group, they are certainly learning the ropes fast. With a few members of the cast schooled by the Dave Morris’ Improv Class, at least they are being trained by the best. Andrew Brimmell and Shahin Mohamadi are two such individuals. Together, with Daniel Belkin, Robin Valerie and Kevin Koch, they play a diverse cast of characters from various social standings. They are caricatures of various occupations and a night’s show can be a discourse in social studies. As with many a performance, Brighella (Shahin Mohamadi) Arlecchino (Kevin Koch) and Columbina (Robin Valerie) introduce what this type of comedy is about and audiences are essentially being taken for a ride of slapstick after a few audience members provide a few ideas and direction to help move the night’s performance along.

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Ten Fringe Shows Not to Be Missed

DV 2007-08 ProgramThe Victoria Fringe Theatre Festival is here and there is no better time to get yourself an artistic shot in the arm than during the month of August. It is during this month that many theatre companies take a much-needed rest after the year’s hullabaloo. People of the arts need their time at the beach too.

Now I am not one to talk. My experience with the Fringe is not on such a grand scale as my best friend and writing partner Ed Sum who has been Fringing since 2009. To admit sheepishly that I have only seen one Fringe show ever, and that I’ve only gone to St. Michael’s University to see a show, it is them who have that distinctive honour of opening my eyes wide open. It was their stage version of Avenue Q last year that finally pulled me off the fence to land onto the well-trimmed green front lawn of the Fringe.

Before Avenue Q, my earliest memory of knowing the Victoria Fringe Festival existed was a play that took A. A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh characters and thrust them into the harsh realities of frontline World War I. It was the first Fringe show I had an urge to see.

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[Victoria Film Festival ’14] Trading an Oyster in for a Film


614 Humboldt St. 
Victoria, BC 
(250) 385-4512

No Victoria Film Festival party can be complete without a trip to the Oyster Bar or Spinnakers. Both have been long time supporters of this show, and sometimes they are the venues for one of the many parties going on, past and present. The brew pub even caters and the hors d’oeuvres I get to try out are always exceptional, but sometimes it’s just the deserts, namely their ice cream in the springtime, that I’m really after. No matter what the treat, these little bites always knock it right out of the park.

And that should be the size raw oysters should be sampled in. The Victoria Film Festival’s Gala Event often serves these tasty treats, but I had to wonder where they came from. I’m assuming the Oyster Bar, and a visit here was definitely on the must hit list.

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